Welcome to Capitol Week In Review, our newsletter keeping you informed about policy concerning educational equity and making our schools and communities more supportive.  You will also hear from us about opportunities to engage in advocacy on topics important to you. 


HB24-1282, Ninth-Grade Success Grant & Performance Reporting, is scheduled to be heard by the House Education Committee, on March 6th.  This bill expands funding for the 9th Grade Success Grant Program, which provides funding to schools to implement a ninth-grade success program.

HB24-1133, Criminal Record Sealing & Expungement Changes, addresses issues raised through the implementation of Colorado’s “Clean Slate” policy, which automatically seals the criminal records of individuals who are convicted of a non-violent offense once certain conditions have been met. The bill was passed unanimously by the House Judiciary Committee and referred to the House Appropriations Committee. 

HB24-1311, Family Affordability Tax Credit, was introduced in the House. The bill creates a family affordability tax credit and will distribute a portion of the state’s $1.8 billion TABOR surplus to families, including those making up to $95,000 a year, to help cover the rising costs of housing, food, and child care. 

HB24-1136, Healthier Social Media Use by Youth, was passed unanimously by the House Educations Committee and referred to the House Appropriations Committee. The bill requires the Department of Education to compile a bank of evidence-based program materials regarding the mental health impacts of social media use by children and teens.



We are thrilled that The House Judiciary Committee unanimously passed HB24-1133, Criminal Record Sealing & Expungement Changes. This bipartisan legislation makes important updates and clarifications to Colorado’s landmark “clean slate” policy (SB22-099) which was signed into law in 2022. These updates are needed to ensure our clean slate policy can be implemented successfully. 

Removing barriers to housing and employment by automatically sealing criminal records of non-violent offenders equips everyone with the opportunity to provide for their families and become more productive citizens. 


In 2019, school leaders in Center, Colorado were alarmed as their high school graduation rates dropped to the lowest in the state. Now, they’re among the highest.  Our team at the Colorado Center for High School Success partnered with educators at Center High School to implement a ninth grade on-track approach that is changing the trajectory for their students and community. 

We must work to ensure that more students in Colorado can access this support, and that’s why we are championing HB24-1282, which expands funding for the 9th Grade Success Grant Program.


Chalkbeat Colorado, 2024 Colorado General Assembly: The people’s guide to following education issues


Welcome to Capitol Week In Review, our newsletter keeping you informed about policy concerning educational equity and making our schools and communities more supportive.  You will also hear from us about opportunities to engage in advocacy on topics important to you. 


HB24-1133, Criminal Record Sealing & Expungement Changes, addresses issues raised through the implementation of Colorado’s “Clean Slate” policy, which automatically seals the criminal records of individuals who are convicted of a non-violent offense once certain conditions have been met. The bill is scheduled to be heard by the House Judiciary Committee, February 21st. 

HB24-1003, Opiate Antagonists and Detection Products in Schools, expands upon current law to allow schools to maintain a supply of opiate antagonists on school buses and allows school bus operators to administer them in good faith. The bill was passed unanimously by the House Education Committee. 

SB24-053, Racial Equity Study, requires the state historical society to conduct a study to determine historical and ongoing effects of slavery and subsequent systemic racism on Black Coloradans that may be attributed to state policies, and to identify measures to address those effects. The bill was passed by the Senate Committee on Finance and referred to the Senate Appropriations Committee.

HB24-1004, Ex-Offenders Practice in Regulated Occupations, creates a process for ex-offenders to receive authorization to practice in state-regulated occupations. The bill is scheduled to be heard by the House Business Affairs and Labor Committee on February 15th.


Nearly a third of Colorado’s population is currently listed in state databases as having a criminal record -many for a single, low-level, and non-violent offense. For these Coloradans, the stigma of a criminal record can create ongoing obstacles to long-term employment, education, and housing. 

SB22-099 was signed into law in 2022, to automatically seal the criminal records of individuals who are convicted of a non-violent offense once they have completed their sentence, a waiting period, and not committed another criminal offense.

In order for this landmark legislation to be implemented successfully, certain clarifications need to be made by the legislature now.

HB24-1133, Criminal Record Sealing & Expungement Changes, is bipartisan legislation to address parts of SB22-099 that need to be clarified. When people can provide for themselves and their children, all Coloradans benefit. This proposed update improves outcomes for individuals, children, and entire families.  


On February 21st, The House Judiciary Committee is scheduled to hear HB24-1133, which will ensure Colorado’s “clean slate” law can be successfully implemented to automatically seal the criminal records of individuals who are convicted of a non-violent offense.

Please email House Judiciary Committee members and ask them to support HB24-1133 to ensure our clean slate policy can be implemented successfully. 


Chalkbeat Colorado, Why some Colorado lawmakers say funding for K-12 schools is at 1989 levels

Chalkbeat Colorado, 2024 Colorado General Assembly: The people’s guide to following education issues


Welcome to Capitol Week In Review, our newsletter keeping you informed about policy concerning educational equity and making our schools and communities more supportive.  You will also hear from us about opportunities to engage in advocacy on topics important to you. 


HB24-1003, Opiate Antagonists and Detection Products in Schools, expands upon current law to allow schools to maintain a supply of opiate antagonists on school buses and allows school bus operators to administer them in good faith. The House Education Committee is scheduled to hear the bill Thursday, February 8th. 

SB24-053, Racial Equity Study, requires the state historical society to conduct a study to determine historical and ongoing effects of slavery and subsequent systemic racism on Black Coloradans that may be attributed to state policies, and to identify measures to address those effects. The Senate Committee on State, Veteran and Military Affairs Committee passed the bill.

HB24-1004, Ex-Offenders Practice in Regulated Occupations, creates a process for ex-offenders to receive authorization to practice in state-regulated occupations. The bill is scheduled to be heard by the House Business Affairs and Labor Committee on Thursday, February 8th. 

HB24-1133, Criminal Record Sealing & Expungement Changes, addresses issues raised through the implementation of Colorado’s “Clean Slate” policy, which automatically seals the criminal records of individuals who are convicted of a non-violent offense once certain conditions have been met. The bill expands eligibility for automatic criminal record sealing for individuals arrested due to mistaken identity, for those acquitted, and convictions for offenses that are no longer considered illegal under new state statute. This bill was introduced in the House.


Englewood High School has been implementing a 9th grade success approach in partnership with our Colorado Center for High School Success for two years. Their 9th Grade Academy is a robust effort to support students by implementing proven interventions to increase the number of 9th graders on-track to graduate by the end of the year.

Colorado schools and districts that are investing time and money implementing a ninth grade on-track approach continue to demonstrate results for students. That is why we are advocating to increase funding for the Colorado 9th Grade Success Grant Program, and make it a permanent program


The need for mental health supports for Colorado children is greater than ever before, and the legislature is considering legislation to help. 

SB24-001, will continue indefinitely, the “I Matter” youth mental health services program which provides up to six free therapy sessions and reimburses participating licensed therapists. SB24-001 cleared the first legislative hurdle when it was passed by the Senate Health and Human Services Committee. It will be considered by the Senate Appropriations Committee in the coming weeks.

At a time when there are many things competing for limited resources, Senators need to hear that supporting our children’s mental health is a top priority for you. Children’s Hospital Colorado declared a “state of emergency” in youth mental health in May 2021 due to striking increases in the number of Colorado kids and teens arriving in emergency rooms seeking support in a mental health crisis.

Email your Senator and ask them to support SB24-001.


Colorado Public Radio, After 30 years, a new way to fund Colorado’s schools is ready for lawmakers’ eyes

Colorado Public Radio, Racial equity study bill passes first hearing at Colorado legislature

Chalkbeat Colorado, 2024 Colorado General Assembly: The people’s guide to following education issues


Welcome to Capitol Week In Review, our newsletter keeping you informed about policy concerning educational equity and making our schools and communities more supportive.  You will also hear from us about opportunities to engage in advocacy on topics important to you. 


SB24-001, Continue Youth Mental Health Services Program, which will continue the “I Matter” youth mental health services program indefinitely, was amended and passed by the Senate Committee on Health and Human Services. It was referred to the Senate Appropriations Committee. 

SB 24-034, Increase Access to School-Based Health Care, authorizes grants for evidence-informed, school-linked healthcare services which may include primary healthcare, behavioral, oral, and preventive healthcare services. The bill is scheduled to be heard by the Senate Education Committee on January 29th. 

SB24-049, Content of Material in Libraries, establishes a process for people to object to a library resource in a school or public library, and creates a framework for reviewing/removing materials. It is scheduled to be heard by the Senate Education Committee, February 12th. 

HB24-1070, Allowing Certain Items at School Graduation, allows preschool, public school, or university students to wear or display religious or cultural regalia at a graduation ceremony. It is scheduled to be heard by the House Education Committee, February 7th. 

HB24-1003, Opiate Antagonists and Detection Products in Schools, expands upon current law to allow schools to maintain a supply of opiate antagonists on school buses and allows school bus operators to administer them in good faith. The bill is scheduled to be heard by the House Education Committee, February 8th. 

HB24-1063, Addressing Abbreviated School Days, is scheduled to be heard by the House Education Committee, February 22nd. The bill clarifies what constitutes an “abbreviated school day” and seeks to address the effect of abbreviated school days on children with disabilities in public schools.


Let’s Improve Colorado’s Recidivism Rates

One of our policy priorities this legislative session is to expand opportunities for remote reporting via online platform or phone for individuals under parole or probation. This enables the use of technology to ensure people can meet the requirements of their parole or probation while supporting their ability to work, seek education, care for children, or other responsibilities.  

By providing comprehensive support and opportunities for reintegration, we not only reduce the risk of recidivism but also contribute to a more productive and inclusive society.  

Currently, lower-risk individuals under probation or parole supervision in Colorado may have the option to check in virtually with their supervising officers in some parts of the state. However, this option varies across the Colorado and we aim t change that. By providing comprehensive support and opportunities for reintegration, we not only reduce the risk of recidivism but also contribute to a more productive and inclusive society.  


Follow Us!

Are we in your feed yet on TikTok and Instagram? This is the best way to get regular updates about the policies we’re tracking, what is happening at the Capitol, and opportunities for you to advocate for legislation that is important to you. 


Chalkbeat Colorado, Colorado bill to make free youth therapy permanent moves forward

Chalkbeat Colorado, 2024 Colorado General Assembly: The people’s guide to following education issues

Welcome to Capitol Week In Review, our newsletter keeping you informed about policy concerning educational equity and making our schools and communities more supportive.  You will also hear from us about opportunities to engage in advocacy on topics important to you. 


SB24-001, Continue Youth Mental Health Services Program, which will continue the “I Matter” youth mental health services program indefinitely, was introduced in the Senate.  

SB 24-034, Increase Access to School-Based Health Care, was introduced in the Senate. The bill authorizes grants for evidence-informed, school-linked health-care services which may include primary health-care, behavioral health-care, oral health-care, and preventive health-care services.

HB24-1003, Opiate Antagonists and Detection Products in Schools, expands upon current law to allow schools to maintain a supply of opiate antagonists on school buses and allows school bus operators to administer them in good faith. The bill was introduced in the House. 

HB24-1063, Addressing Abbreviated School Days, was introduced in the House. The bill clarifies what constitutes an “abbreviated school day” and seeks to address the effect of abbreviated school days on children with disabilities in public schools.

HB24-1070, Allowing Certain Items at School Graduation, was introduced in the House. The bill allows a preschool, public school, or university students to wear/display religious or cultural regalia at a graduation ceremony.


Increasing Graduation Rates by Investing in 9th Grade On-Track

9th grade has come to be well known as the make-or-break year.  How well students perform academically in 9th grade can predict their future success.  To be “on-track” means a 9th grade student has earned at least a quarter of the credits needed to graduate and received no more than one F in any course. Research shows that on-track status is a stronger predictor of high school graduation than race/ethnicity, level of poverty, and test scores combined!   

9th  Grade Success programming includes targeted interventions, transition supports, school-based teaching teams, and certain instructional approaches. 

This year, we are advocating for legislators to increase funding for the Colorado 9th Grade Success Grant Program, and make it a permanent program. This will allow more Colorado schools to participate in the 9th Grade Success Grant Program, which is changing the trajectory for many Colorado high schoolers.


Follow Us on TikTok

Did you know we are on TikTok now? Stay informed about ways to advocate for what matters to you by following us for regular updates. Next week, we are launching a series about the legislature, policymaking, and advocacy. Don’t miss it! 


Chalkbeat Colorado, Five things to know about how Colorado leaders propose to reshape workforce education

Chalkbeat Colorado, Colorado becomes one of the first to employ an incarcerated professor

Chalkbeat Colorado, 2024 Colorado General Assembly: The people’s guide to following education issues

Colorado Sun, Colorado’s 2024 legislative session begins today. Here’s your guide to get involved

Happy New Year! Welcome to Capitol Week In Review, our newsletter keeping you informed about legislation concerning educational equity and making our schools and communities more supportive.   The 2024 Colorado Legislative Session convened January 10th and for the next five months, policymakers will be making decisions that affect our communities, students, educators, and families. 


The Second Session of the 74th General Assembly kicked off this week with mostly pomp and circumstance. Members were sworn in, committee assignments were made, and legislation started being introduced. 

Governor Jared Polis delivered his State of the State address this week, highlighting housing, transit, public safety and other priorities. He celebrated the multi-year effort to fund free full-day Kindergarten and preschool for Colorado families and applauded legislators for acting to support policy and funding to “ensure more than 300,000 Colorado children have healthy meals through Summer EBT.”

Governor Polis also outlined plans to eliminate the Budget Stabilization Factor saying, “This historic investment means an additional $705 per student on average, or another $15,500 more for a classroom of 22 kids. This is on top of last year’s increase of more than $1,000 per student, made possible by this legislature. 

It means better teacher pay, expanded learning opportunities for students, professional development for teachers, and better resources in our classrooms.” 

You can watch the recording here. 


Get Involved!  At Stand Colorado, we deeply believe that policymaking is most effective when the voices of those impacted are at the center of decision-making. Want more regular updates about key bills and opportunities to engage? Follow us on social media to stay informed about ways to advocate for what matters to you!  

While legislators are the ones introducing and voting on the bills, YOU can play a critical role too. We believe in the power of community, so we are here to support you if you want to get involved. 


Chalkbeat Colorado, 2024 Colorado General Assembly: The people’s guide to following education issues

Colorado Sun, 8 storylines to watch at the Colorado Capitol this year as the 2024 legislative session begins

We spent time this summer in conversation with parents, educators, policymakers, and community members. Now our team has identified goals that build upon our impact in recent years and act on what we heard in listening sessions. Will you please weigh in on our plans?  

Our Goals for Next Year:

  • Early Literacy
    • Understanding how to better support educators to use the science of reading and evidence-based curriculums and practices in their literacy instruction.
  • Ninth Grade Success
    • Expanding funding for the Ninth Grade Success Grant program.
  • Supportive Schools
    • Promoting educator diversity by securing continued funding for policies that create equity in teacher preparation and alternative pathways to enter the workforce.
  • Justice System Reform
    • Helping prevent recidivism in our justice system by updating probation and parole supervision to include remote check-in options.
    • Expanding access to criminal record sealing for non-violent offenses, helping to remove barriers to housing and employment.
    • Reducing unjust fees for incarcerated individuals and their families. 

We cannot do this work alone – we need your help! Read more about our priorities and let us know which ones you are interested in working with us to advance.  

We know the importance of students reading on grade level by the end of third grade, so the Stand for Children team is collecting feedback through this survey from K-3 early literacy educators, administrators, and support staff, like interventionist.  We will not share any identifiable information, including district or school information; we want to ensure we are hearing from educators across Colorado.  

As champions of early literacy, we know the importance of educators having the necessary support, tools, and resources, to ensure all children are reading on grade level by the end of third grade. We want to understand how recent early literacy policy changes are working and where additional support is needed.  

Educator voice is essential, so ff you are an early literacy educator and/or K-3 classroom administrator, please take a few minutes to share your feedback by completing the survey.  

This information will be compiled into materials to report out the views of educators and may be used to inform future policy to support early literacy educators.  

About Our Early Literacy Work: 

Stand for Children Colorado has a longstanding and deep commitment to improving early literacy outcomes for Colorado students and supporting educators.  In 2012, Stand supported the passage of the READ Act, Colorado’s early literacy policy to provide targeted supports for K-3 students reading significantly below grade level. In 2018, we championed HB18-1393, which strengthened the READ Act by increasing funding for Early Literacy Grants and for evidence-based approaches to be used. SB19-199 ensures that evidence-based literacy programming supports teacher training. In 2021, we advocated for the addition of a literacy-specific component to exams for teacher licensure to ensure that training programs prioritize using evidence-based reading approaches. Finally, in 2022, we championed SB22-004, which expands the science of reading training to principals and administrators. These policies were developed after hearing feedback from teachers about changes that would support them, and we are proud to advocate for them alongside educators from across the state.

We have also developed two reports studying early literacy in Colorado: Improving Early Literacy in Colorado: Realizing the Promise of the READ Act (2016) and The State of Literacy In Colorado (2017). 

Top Legislative Priorities Now Law

We are thrilled that all of our top priority bills have been signed into law. 

In our blog, you will find updates on each of the policy priorities we shared prior to the legislative session focused on advancing educational equity, youth and racial justice in Colorado, and making our schools and communities safer and more supportive.  

We are so grateful to the many advocates, partners, and policymakers we worked alongside to bring these policies to fruition. Parents, educators and community leaders participated in listening sessions last summer to identify needs and policy solutions, engaged with lawmakers, testified before committees and shared their experiences with members of the media. Hundreds of advocates sent thousands of emails to policymakers, and 27 shared their lived experiences in testimony before committees nearly 60 times.  These impactful policy changes will mean more and better support for Colorado students and educators. They represent steps toward safer and more supportive schools and communities for all Coloradans. 


Advocates at Stand for Children day at the Capitol

Advocates Join Stand for Day at the Capitol 

More than a dozen parents, educators and community leaders joined our team for a day at the Capitol. These advocates were briefed on the latest on key policies moving through the Capitol, listened to Senate floor debate (and were even invited to sit on the Senate floor), got a tour of the Capitol and shared their policy priorities. “I am very fortunate to be here today with Stand. For many years, I have involved myself into the practices and policies of schools, but I’ve never really had the opportunity to dive in and really make a difference at in the policies that are implemented at the state level. This is really what we need in order to be able to make the changes for our kids.”  Flor Orozco, parent and Stand Advocacy Fellow.


Advancing Language Justice in Denver Public Schools

We are thrilled to announce that after months of collaboration, learning, and relationship-building, Language Justice was added as a priority as an ENDS statement that talks about equity in Denver Public Schools (DPS). ENDS statements are “description of the long-term goals for the district”.  This statement was approved by the DPS Board of Education.

Language Justice is defined as a commitment to ensuring all voices are heard and understood in the process of community engagement. It is more than having access to translators and interpreters, it is a practice to create inclusive and equitable spaces so that community, families, students, and staff can participate in the language of their heart. Read more.  


Funding Expanded for Ninth Grade On-Track Program

$1.6 million for the Ninth Grade Success Grant program was included in HB23-1231, Math in Pre-Kindergarten Through Twelfth Grade. This funding will help ensure that more Colorado students finish their 9th-grade year on track and graduate high school prepared for post-secondary success.

Read more about our Center for High School Success. 


Lauren Kinney shares her experience from Day at the Capitol

“I’ve been working with Stand as a fellow and it has invited me to take up space in politics that I never really thought I belonged in or never knew the right entry point. Now because of this I feel inspired to do more community organizing to find ways that I can advocate not only for students but also for members of the queer community, and BIPOC voices. I believe that Stand is doing some incredible work.” Lauren Kinney, educator and Stand Advocacy Fellow


Bri Buentello, Stand Government Affairs Director and former Special Education Educator on legislation that will expand translation of individualized education plans

“I’ve seen the disproportionate impact that a language barrier brings, specifically in Latino kids,” she said. “It’s going to drastically increase parental involvement in the IEP process. This is going to lead to us better serving students.”  

Learn More

Early Literacy Educators: We Want to Hear from You!

Stand for Children Colorado will be publishing a report to give an update on the impact of literacy policy in recent years, including the passage of the READ Act in 2012 and subsequent updates related to evidence-based curriculum alignment, teacher and principal training in the science of reading, and increased funding for early literacy grants.  

We will be centering educator voice and experience, so if you are an early literacy educator and/or K-3 classroom teacher or administrator, please take a few minutes to complete this survey. Our goal is to hear from as many Colorado educators as possible, so please consider sharing this with your colleagues.  

Learn more about our early literacy work. 

Thank you for Standing

Yesterday marked the end of the 30-day period for Governor Polis to sign into law the bills that were passed during the 2023 legislative session. We are thrilled to tell you that all of our top priority bills have been signed into law. 

Below you will find updates on the policy priorities we shared prior to the legislative session focused on advancing educational equity, youth and racial justice in Colorado, and making our schools and communities safer and more supportive.  

We would be remiss if we didn’t, once again, thank the many advocates, partners, and policy makers we worked alongside to bring these policies to fruition. 

Parents, educators and community leaders participated in listening sessions to identify needs and policy solutions, engaged with lawmakers, testified before committees and shared their experiences with members of the media. Hundreds of advocates sent thousands of emails to policymakers and 27 shared their lived experiences in testimony before committees nearly 60 times. 

These impactful policy changes will mean more and better support for Colorado students and educators. They represent steps toward safer and more supportive schools and communities for all Coloradans. 

Stand’s 2023 Top Legislative Priorities

Updates on our 2023 top policy priorities

Expand funding for the Ninth Grade On-Track Program. 

HB23-1231, Math in Pre-Kindergarten Through Twelfth Grade, supports math educators with evidence-based training and interventions to help K- 12th-grade students struggling in math. Importantly, this bill includes $1.6 million for the Ninth Grade Success Grant program to help ensure that more Colorado students finish their 9th-grade year on track and graduate high school prepared for post-secondary success.   Status: Signed into law! 

Remove barriers to support teaching candidates, expanding and diversifying the educator workforce.  

HB23-1001, Expanding Assistance For Educator Programs, a continuation of HB22-1220, expands eligibility for financial assistance and offers loan forgiveness to a larger pool of educators who qualify for state programs. Status: Signed into law! 

HB23-1064, Interstate Teacher Mobility Compact, creates a compact to make it easier for active-duty military spouses to transfer their teaching licenses without further testing, thereby allowing them to teach in Colorado classrooms faster. Status: Signed into law! 

SB23-087, Teacher Degree Apprenticeship Program, creates a teacher degree apprenticeship program as an alternative route to teacher licensure and helps to alleviate the educator shortage. Status: Signed into law! 

Ensure equitable school funding. 

SB23-099, Special Education Funding, increases Special Education Funding by $40,203, 671. Status: Signed into law! 

Eliminate the practice of lying to juveniles during interrogation.  

HB23-1042, Admissibility Standards For Juvenile Statements, increases funding for interrogation training for law enforcement, as well as improves the general reliability of confessions by requiring all juvenile interrogations to be recorded. Status: Signed into law! 

Cap the cost of phone calls from prison or jail.  

HB23-1133, Cost Of Phone Calls for Persons In Custody, mandates that the Department of Corrections (DOC) provide communications services to persons in DOC custody in a correctional facility or private prison. Status: Signed into law! 


OTHER KEY BILLS WE WORKED TO ADVANCE THAT ARE NOW LAW 

HB23-1003, School Mental Health Assessment, creates the sixth through twelfth-grade mental health assessment program.  

HB23-1168, Legal Representation and Students with Disabilities,  requires CDE to create and maintain a list of attorneys qualified to represent a parent in a due process complaint and creates a fund to pay attorneys defending parents against due process complaints filed by an education provider.  

HB23-1223, Task Force to Prioritize Grants Target Population, creates a task force to establish shared goals and guidelines for prioritizing new and existing grant money to reduce youth violence, suicide, and delinquency risk factors. 

HB23-1249, Reduce Justice Involvement for Young Children, funds the expansion of existing local Collaborative Management Programs (CMP) statewide to serve 10-12-year-old children that come into contact with law enforcement and child victims with support from the Department of Human Services. 

HB23-1263, Translating Individualized Education Programs, permits the multidisciplinary team that creates an individualized education program (IEP) for a child, who may be eligible for special education services, to translate the IEP draft documents into the dominant language spoken in the home of the child’s parent, guardian, or legal custodian.  

HB23-1290, Proposition EE Funding Retention Rate Reduction, refers a ballot issue to the voters at the November 7, 2023, statewide election to allow the state to retain and spend state revenues that would otherwise need to be refunded. If voters approve the ballot measure: the money set aside will be transferred to the preschool programs cash fund and the general fund and the nicotine tax will stay at the rates required by proposition EE. 

HB23-1291, Procedures For Expulsion Hearing Officers, addresses due process rights for students by mandating the sharing of evidence during an expulsion hearing, prohibiting conflicts of interest for the hearing officer, as well as requiring annual training regarding student development, restorative justice, and special education and the law.  

SB23-004,Employment Of School Mental Health Professionals,  authorizes a school district to employ health professionals, who are not licensed by the Colorado Department of Education but hold a Colorado license for their profession. 

SB23-039, Reduce Child And Incarcerated Parent Separation,  requires the Department of Human Services to prioritize and facilitate communication and family time between children and their parents who are incarcerated. 

SB-23-287, Public School Finance, increases the statewide base per pupil funding for the 2023-24 budget year by $598.25 (to account for inflation) and creates a public-school finance task force. 

HB23-1100, Restrict County Jail Contracts with ICE, prevents the state from contracting with a private company to detain individuals for federal immigration purposes and begins a review process of these contracts over the next two years.