Welcome to Capitol Week In Review, our newsletter keeping you informed about policy concerning educational equity and making our schools and communities more supportive.  You will also hear from us about opportunities to engage in advocacy on topics important to you. 


HB24-1282, Ninth-Grade Success Grant & Performance Reporting, is scheduled to be heard by the House Education Committee, on March 6th.  This bill expands funding for the 9th Grade Success Grant Program, which provides funding to schools to implement a ninth-grade success program.

HB24-1133, Criminal Record Sealing & Expungement Changes, addresses issues raised through the implementation of Colorado’s “Clean Slate” policy, which automatically seals the criminal records of individuals who are convicted of a non-violent offense once certain conditions have been met. The bill was passed unanimously by the House Judiciary Committee and referred to the House Appropriations Committee. 

HB24-1311, Family Affordability Tax Credit, was introduced in the House. The bill creates a family affordability tax credit and will distribute a portion of the state’s $1.8 billion TABOR surplus to families, including those making up to $95,000 a year, to help cover the rising costs of housing, food, and child care. 

HB24-1136, Healthier Social Media Use by Youth, was passed unanimously by the House Educations Committee and referred to the House Appropriations Committee. The bill requires the Department of Education to compile a bank of evidence-based program materials regarding the mental health impacts of social media use by children and teens.



We are thrilled that The House Judiciary Committee unanimously passed HB24-1133, Criminal Record Sealing & Expungement Changes. This bipartisan legislation makes important updates and clarifications to Colorado’s landmark “clean slate” policy (SB22-099) which was signed into law in 2022. These updates are needed to ensure our clean slate policy can be implemented successfully. 

Removing barriers to housing and employment by automatically sealing criminal records of non-violent offenders equips everyone with the opportunity to provide for their families and become more productive citizens. 


In 2019, school leaders in Center, Colorado were alarmed as their high school graduation rates dropped to the lowest in the state. Now, they’re among the highest.  Our team at the Colorado Center for High School Success partnered with educators at Center High School to implement a ninth grade on-track approach that is changing the trajectory for their students and community. 

We must work to ensure that more students in Colorado can access this support, and that’s why we are championing HB24-1282, which expands funding for the 9th Grade Success Grant Program.


Chalkbeat Colorado, 2024 Colorado General Assembly: The people’s guide to following education issues


HB24-1282, Ninth-Grade Success Grant & Performance Reporting, was introduced. This bill expands funding for the 9th Grade Success Grant Program, which will allow more Colorado schools to implement the approach changing the trajectory for our high school students.

Decades of research has shown that supporting students by implementing a 9th grade success approach improves graduation rates, and the impacts in Colorado schools speak for themselves.


9th grade on-track work includes implementing targeted interventions, transition supports, school-based teaching teams, certain instructional approaches, and more.  Schools doing this work must invest financially and increase staff collaboration.

We will share more soon about how you can join us in advocating for this critical legislation.

Welcome to Capitol Week In Review, our newsletter keeping you informed about policy concerning educational equity and making our schools and communities more supportive.  You will also hear from us about opportunities to engage in advocacy on topics important to you. 


HB24-1133, Criminal Record Sealing & Expungement Changes, addresses issues raised through the implementation of Colorado’s “Clean Slate” policy, which automatically seals the criminal records of individuals who are convicted of a non-violent offense once certain conditions have been met. The bill is scheduled to be heard by the House Judiciary Committee, February 21st. 

HB24-1003, Opiate Antagonists and Detection Products in Schools, expands upon current law to allow schools to maintain a supply of opiate antagonists on school buses and allows school bus operators to administer them in good faith. The bill was passed unanimously by the House Education Committee. 

SB24-053, Racial Equity Study, requires the state historical society to conduct a study to determine historical and ongoing effects of slavery and subsequent systemic racism on Black Coloradans that may be attributed to state policies, and to identify measures to address those effects. The bill was passed by the Senate Committee on Finance and referred to the Senate Appropriations Committee.

HB24-1004, Ex-Offenders Practice in Regulated Occupations, creates a process for ex-offenders to receive authorization to practice in state-regulated occupations. The bill is scheduled to be heard by the House Business Affairs and Labor Committee on February 15th.


Nearly a third of Colorado’s population is currently listed in state databases as having a criminal record -many for a single, low-level, and non-violent offense. For these Coloradans, the stigma of a criminal record can create ongoing obstacles to long-term employment, education, and housing. 

SB22-099 was signed into law in 2022, to automatically seal the criminal records of individuals who are convicted of a non-violent offense once they have completed their sentence, a waiting period, and not committed another criminal offense.

In order for this landmark legislation to be implemented successfully, certain clarifications need to be made by the legislature now.

HB24-1133, Criminal Record Sealing & Expungement Changes, is bipartisan legislation to address parts of SB22-099 that need to be clarified. When people can provide for themselves and their children, all Coloradans benefit. This proposed update improves outcomes for individuals, children, and entire families.  


On February 21st, The House Judiciary Committee is scheduled to hear HB24-1133, which will ensure Colorado’s “clean slate” law can be successfully implemented to automatically seal the criminal records of individuals who are convicted of a non-violent offense.

Please email House Judiciary Committee members and ask them to support HB24-1133 to ensure our clean slate policy can be implemented successfully. 


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Welcome to Capitol Week In Review, our newsletter keeping you informed about policy concerning educational equity and making our schools and communities more supportive.  You will also hear from us about opportunities to engage in advocacy on topics important to you. 


HB24-1003, Opiate Antagonists and Detection Products in Schools, expands upon current law to allow schools to maintain a supply of opiate antagonists on school buses and allows school bus operators to administer them in good faith. The House Education Committee is scheduled to hear the bill Thursday, February 8th. 

SB24-053, Racial Equity Study, requires the state historical society to conduct a study to determine historical and ongoing effects of slavery and subsequent systemic racism on Black Coloradans that may be attributed to state policies, and to identify measures to address those effects. The Senate Committee on State, Veteran and Military Affairs Committee passed the bill.

HB24-1004, Ex-Offenders Practice in Regulated Occupations, creates a process for ex-offenders to receive authorization to practice in state-regulated occupations. The bill is scheduled to be heard by the House Business Affairs and Labor Committee on Thursday, February 8th. 

HB24-1133, Criminal Record Sealing & Expungement Changes, addresses issues raised through the implementation of Colorado’s “Clean Slate” policy, which automatically seals the criminal records of individuals who are convicted of a non-violent offense once certain conditions have been met. The bill expands eligibility for automatic criminal record sealing for individuals arrested due to mistaken identity, for those acquitted, and convictions for offenses that are no longer considered illegal under new state statute. This bill was introduced in the House.


Englewood High School has been implementing a 9th grade success approach in partnership with our Colorado Center for High School Success for two years. Their 9th Grade Academy is a robust effort to support students by implementing proven interventions to increase the number of 9th graders on-track to graduate by the end of the year.

Colorado schools and districts that are investing time and money implementing a ninth grade on-track approach continue to demonstrate results for students. That is why we are advocating to increase funding for the Colorado 9th Grade Success Grant Program, and make it a permanent program


The need for mental health supports for Colorado children is greater than ever before, and the legislature is considering legislation to help. 

SB24-001, will continue indefinitely, the “I Matter” youth mental health services program which provides up to six free therapy sessions and reimburses participating licensed therapists. SB24-001 cleared the first legislative hurdle when it was passed by the Senate Health and Human Services Committee. It will be considered by the Senate Appropriations Committee in the coming weeks.

At a time when there are many things competing for limited resources, Senators need to hear that supporting our children’s mental health is a top priority for you. Children’s Hospital Colorado declared a “state of emergency” in youth mental health in May 2021 due to striking increases in the number of Colorado kids and teens arriving in emergency rooms seeking support in a mental health crisis.

Email your Senator and ask them to support SB24-001.


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The need for mental health supports for Colorado children is greater than ever before, and the legislature is considering legislation to help. 

SB24-001, will continue indefinitely, the “I Matter” youth mental health services program which provides up to six free therapy sessions and reimburses participating licensed therapists. SB24-001 was just passed by the Senate Health and Human Services Committee and will be considered by the Senate Appropriations Committee soon.

At a time when there are many things competing for limited resources, Senators need to hear that supporting our children’s mental health is a top priority for you. Children’s Hospital Colorado declared a “state of emergency” in youth mental health in May 2021 due to striking increases in the number of Colorado kids and teens arriving in emergency rooms seeking support in a mental health crisis.

 Email your Senator and ask them to support SB24-001.

Almost 11,000 children and teens have used the program already. If SB24-001 is not passed, the “I Matter” program will end this summer.

Please weigh in today.

Welcome to Capitol Week In Review, our newsletter keeping you informed about policy concerning educational equity and making our schools and communities more supportive.  You will also hear from us about opportunities to engage in advocacy on topics important to you. 


SB24-001, Continue Youth Mental Health Services Program, which will continue the “I Matter” youth mental health services program indefinitely, was amended and passed by the Senate Committee on Health and Human Services. It was referred to the Senate Appropriations Committee. 

SB 24-034, Increase Access to School-Based Health Care, authorizes grants for evidence-informed, school-linked healthcare services which may include primary healthcare, behavioral, oral, and preventive healthcare services. The bill is scheduled to be heard by the Senate Education Committee on January 29th. 

SB24-049, Content of Material in Libraries, establishes a process for people to object to a library resource in a school or public library, and creates a framework for reviewing/removing materials. It is scheduled to be heard by the Senate Education Committee, February 12th. 

HB24-1070, Allowing Certain Items at School Graduation, allows preschool, public school, or university students to wear or display religious or cultural regalia at a graduation ceremony. It is scheduled to be heard by the House Education Committee, February 7th. 

HB24-1003, Opiate Antagonists and Detection Products in Schools, expands upon current law to allow schools to maintain a supply of opiate antagonists on school buses and allows school bus operators to administer them in good faith. The bill is scheduled to be heard by the House Education Committee, February 8th. 

HB24-1063, Addressing Abbreviated School Days, is scheduled to be heard by the House Education Committee, February 22nd. The bill clarifies what constitutes an “abbreviated school day” and seeks to address the effect of abbreviated school days on children with disabilities in public schools.


Let’s Improve Colorado’s Recidivism Rates

One of our policy priorities this legislative session is to expand opportunities for remote reporting via online platform or phone for individuals under parole or probation. This enables the use of technology to ensure people can meet the requirements of their parole or probation while supporting their ability to work, seek education, care for children, or other responsibilities.  

By providing comprehensive support and opportunities for reintegration, we not only reduce the risk of recidivism but also contribute to a more productive and inclusive society.  

Currently, lower-risk individuals under probation or parole supervision in Colorado may have the option to check in virtually with their supervising officers in some parts of the state. However, this option varies across the Colorado and we aim t change that. By providing comprehensive support and opportunities for reintegration, we not only reduce the risk of recidivism but also contribute to a more productive and inclusive society.  


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Are we in your feed yet on TikTok and Instagram? This is the best way to get regular updates about the policies we’re tracking, what is happening at the Capitol, and opportunities for you to advocate for legislation that is important to you. 


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Welcome to Capitol Week In Review, our newsletter keeping you informed about policy concerning educational equity and making our schools and communities more supportive.  You will also hear from us about opportunities to engage in advocacy on topics important to you. 


SB24-001, Continue Youth Mental Health Services Program, which will continue the “I Matter” youth mental health services program indefinitely, was introduced in the Senate.  

SB 24-034, Increase Access to School-Based Health Care, was introduced in the Senate. The bill authorizes grants for evidence-informed, school-linked health-care services which may include primary health-care, behavioral health-care, oral health-care, and preventive health-care services.

HB24-1003, Opiate Antagonists and Detection Products in Schools, expands upon current law to allow schools to maintain a supply of opiate antagonists on school buses and allows school bus operators to administer them in good faith. The bill was introduced in the House. 

HB24-1063, Addressing Abbreviated School Days, was introduced in the House. The bill clarifies what constitutes an “abbreviated school day” and seeks to address the effect of abbreviated school days on children with disabilities in public schools.

HB24-1070, Allowing Certain Items at School Graduation, was introduced in the House. The bill allows a preschool, public school, or university students to wear/display religious or cultural regalia at a graduation ceremony.


Increasing Graduation Rates by Investing in 9th Grade On-Track

9th grade has come to be well known as the make-or-break year.  How well students perform academically in 9th grade can predict their future success.  To be “on-track” means a 9th grade student has earned at least a quarter of the credits needed to graduate and received no more than one F in any course. Research shows that on-track status is a stronger predictor of high school graduation than race/ethnicity, level of poverty, and test scores combined!   

9th  Grade Success programming includes targeted interventions, transition supports, school-based teaching teams, and certain instructional approaches. 

This year, we are advocating for legislators to increase funding for the Colorado 9th Grade Success Grant Program, and make it a permanent program. This will allow more Colorado schools to participate in the 9th Grade Success Grant Program, which is changing the trajectory for many Colorado high schoolers.


Follow Us on TikTok

Did you know we are on TikTok now? Stay informed about ways to advocate for what matters to you by following us for regular updates. Next week, we are launching a series about the legislature, policymaking, and advocacy. Don’t miss it! 


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Colorado Sun, Colorado’s 2024 legislative session begins today. Here’s your guide to get involved

Happy New Year! Welcome to Capitol Week In Review, our newsletter keeping you informed about legislation concerning educational equity and making our schools and communities more supportive.   The 2024 Colorado Legislative Session convened January 10th and for the next five months, policymakers will be making decisions that affect our communities, students, educators, and families. 


The Second Session of the 74th General Assembly kicked off this week with mostly pomp and circumstance. Members were sworn in, committee assignments were made, and legislation started being introduced. 

Governor Jared Polis delivered his State of the State address this week, highlighting housing, transit, public safety and other priorities. He celebrated the multi-year effort to fund free full-day Kindergarten and preschool for Colorado families and applauded legislators for acting to support policy and funding to “ensure more than 300,000 Colorado children have healthy meals through Summer EBT.”

Governor Polis also outlined plans to eliminate the Budget Stabilization Factor saying, “This historic investment means an additional $705 per student on average, or another $15,500 more for a classroom of 22 kids. This is on top of last year’s increase of more than $1,000 per student, made possible by this legislature. 

It means better teacher pay, expanded learning opportunities for students, professional development for teachers, and better resources in our classrooms.” 

You can watch the recording here. 


Get Involved!  At Stand Colorado, we deeply believe that policymaking is most effective when the voices of those impacted are at the center of decision-making. Want more regular updates about key bills and opportunities to engage? Follow us on social media to stay informed about ways to advocate for what matters to you!  

While legislators are the ones introducing and voting on the bills, YOU can play a critical role too. We believe in the power of community, so we are here to support you if you want to get involved. 


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Last year we championed, HB23-1133, Cost of Phone Calls for Persons in Custody This bill was passed, making prison communication free across Colorado in state and private facilities. 

This year, one of our top priorities is to ensure this policy can be implemented as planned by 2025 by protecting the ramped up funding needed to bring free prison phone calls to families. The bill cut call costs by 25% in the first year, 35% in the second year, and will then make all calls free starting July 1, 2025. 

Every year, Colorado families –who are disproportionately Black, brown, and low-income – pay over $8.8 million to speak to their incarcerated loved ones. Over 50% of families with an incarcerated loved one struggle to meet basic housing and food needs. One out of three families with a loved one behind bars goes into debt just to stay in touch, and women carry 87% of the burden

Research has shown that keeping families connected while a loved one is incarcerated helps reduce recidivism. Now, it is critical that we protect the ramped-up funding needed to ensure this policy can be fully implemented. Sign up to get updates on this important policy so you will be ready to advocate for children and families when the legislative session kicks off in January!

Did you know, four out of ten people released from Colorado prisons in 2018 returned within three years, and two out of ten people released from prison returned for technical violations (meaning they did not comply with the terms & conditions of probation or parole)?

That’s why one of our policy priorities next year is to expand opportunities for remote reporting (via online platform or phone) for individuals under parole or probation.  This enables us to use technology to ensure people can meet the requirements of their parole or probation while supporting their ability to work, seek education, care for children, or other responsibilities.   

Currently, lower-risk individuals under probation or parole supervision in Colorado may have the option to check in virtually with their supervising officers in many jurisdictions. However, this option varies across the state. With this policy, we have the opportunity to improve our recidivism rates in Colorado. By providing comprehensive support and opportunities for reintegration, we not only reduce the risk of recidivism but also contribute to a more productive and inclusive society.       

Please sign up to stay informed about how you can join us in advancing this important policy next legislative session to level the playing field and offer remote supervision statewide.