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Oregon Blog

Beaverton chapter endorses Brian Tosky, Democrat for House District 34

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The Oregon legislature plays a key role in funding and policy decisions that affect every child in Beaverton. That's why the Beaverton chapter works to elect leaders who are deeply committed to improving educational opportunities for children, and who put students at the forefront of education policies.

Reynolds parents demand action on ELL

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Last night, about a dozen parents from the Reynolds chapter attended a school board meeting to demand a better partnership from the school district and better results for children in English Language Learner programs. Board members were quick to respond and pledge their support to work with us on this incredibly important issue. 

End the perverse incentive to keep kids in ELD

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Just before spring break, I testified before members of the school funding task force. Now that our kids are settled back into the classroom and I'm settled back in at work, I can't help but return my thoughts to those who we're failing -- specifically the 51% of the 60,000 students learning English. It doesn't have to be that way, and I think you'll see why in my testimony:

CORRECTION: Length of Oregon school year compared to major urban districts

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CORRECTION: A couple weeks ago, we published information comparing instructional time in Oregon to various urban districts across the country. We used Oregon’s minimum instructional hour requirements, and compared them to time in school as calculated by the National Center on Time and Learning.

Jackson County chapter requests school board to solicit feedback from parents, students and teachers on proficiency grading

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The Jackson County chapter made the following statement on Monday night at Jackson County Schools' board meeting.

Chair Thomas,

Members of the School Board

Stand for Children leaders applaud the recent Amendment to HB 4150 regarding proficiency reporting and believe it provides a measure of flexibility which will ensure all students have a better chance to succeed and graduate under proficiency guidelines.

Stand for Children Oregon looks forward to working with business and labor on revenue reform

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Yesterday, Governor John Kitzhaber announced that business and labor groups have agreed not to pursue divisive ballot measures, marking the first step in an inclusive effort to overhaul Oregon’s tax structure. We look forward to collaborating with our friends in business and labor, and with Democrats and Republicans, as we work to solve the financial problems that have plagued our state and our schools.

It's time for an agreement in Medford

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Yesterday, the Stand for Children chapter in Jackson County, with two local community-based organizations, called on the Medford School District and the Medford Education Association to reach an agreement. Here's what the statement said:

How can we improve the graduation rate in Oregon?

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As advocates, we must start by asking the tough questions. What works? What are we doing wrong? How can we be better?

That’s exactly what we’re asking as we review the graduation rates just released by the Oregon Department of Education. The graduation rates stayed relatively steady in 2013, with minor improvements in most urban areas.

Thank you for another engaging member summit!

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This may have been our most packed agenda yet. We'll post presentation materials in the space below. Use the comment box to request specific material that we did not post yet, or to pose any follow-up questions.

Let's revive the American Dream in Oregon

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In the month that marks the 50th anniversary of Lyndon B. Johnson’s declaration of a “war on poverty,” we’ve seen stories about what works and what doesn’t. This week, we heard a lot of chatter about The Equality of Opportunity Project, a Harvard economics research team, who let us in on a well-kept secret: the American Dream is dead—or at least it’s alive and barely breathing.

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