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Topic: News & Press

Washington's first public charter school opens its doors

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Washington’s first public charter school opens its doors today, signaling a new era in education for students and parents throughout our state.

At the opening event, it began to rain, which Rep. Eric Pettigrew said was fitting since we are planting seeds and investing in our children.

Located in Seattle, First Place Scholars will serve nearly 100 children from kindergarten through fifth grade this year.

Washington students don’t make the grade for No Child Left Behind

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Now that Washington has returned to No Child Left Behind—a broken federal law that hurts students and teachers—any school whose students are not meeting 100% proficiency in reading and math is deemed a failing school.

Test results were released on Wednesday, August 27 and, just like we anticipated, most schools didn’t make the grade.

Going Back to No Child Left Behind: What Parents Need to Know

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Cinzia Lettieri is an intern at Stand for Children and a recent graduate of the University of Washington's Master of Education in Education Policy program.

Welcome back No Child Left Behind!

Until recently, you’ve been on a nice long vacation from our public schools, but now you’re back!  

What we can learn from Washington's 14 new potential charter school applicants

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Washington's first public charter school will open this fall in Seattle, while 7 more will open the following school year.

But before a charter school can ever open its doors, it first has to go through an intensive application process.

And there is certainly no guarantee of approval.

Seattle’s Ambitious Plan for Universal Pre-Kindergarten

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Last week Mayor Ed Murray revealed his plan for Universal Pre-Kindergarten in Seattle. The Action Plan gave Seattleites their first view of what this program could look like for the city.

The plan also documented the city’s need: as many as 30% of Seattle’s three and four year olds come from families who do not have the financial means to pay for a preschool program and even more may be enrolled in programs whose quality is questionable.

Washington charter school advocates gather for first conference

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Last week, I attended the first annual Washington State Charter Schools Association Conference along with 370 educators, parents, community leaders, policy-makers and advocates to discuss how to create high-quality public charter schools in our state.

Notably, this was the first time that public charter school champions gathered together since the historic passage of Initiative 1240, which made possible the creation of public charter schools in Washington.

In the wake of losing control over $40 million for schools, lawmakers now scramble for cash

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Just five days after Washington became the first state to lose its waiver from No Child Left Behind—and over $40 million in federal education funding—lawmakers are scrambling to find new money for schools.

In a report to the Washington State Supreme Court, state lawmakers outlined their progress to comply with the McCleary decision, which ruled the state had failed in its "paramount duty" to fund public education.

Back to No Child Left Behind

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Washington just became the first state to lose its waiver from the punitive, outdated No Child Left Behind requirements. I am disappointed, but not surprised.

The loss of the waiver and control of over $40 million in funding could have easily been avoided, but the legislature failed to act.

Washington State Charter Schools Association to host first conference

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Interested in learning more about public charter schools in Washington? Then you'll definitely want to check out the First Annual WA Charters Conference on May 8 - 9, 2014.

Here's the run-down:

We are at a critical time for public education in Washington.  With the recent passage of Initiative 1240 and the subsequent approval of eight schools, we must come together to support the development of high quality public charter school sector for students in our state.

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