|   2016 annual report

Welcome

Jonah Edelman,
Co-founder & CEO of Stand for Children

We’re celebrating 20 years of changing children’s lives.

But our work is far from over.

It was hard to know where to start when I first walked into the new Stand for Children offices as a 25-year-old, with a team of just two others.

But, in the two decades since our founding rally, we have positively impacted the education and lives of millions of children. On June 1, 2016, we proudly celebrated our 20th anniversary.

In those 20 years, we have grown from an idea into an incredibly hard-working staff of 130 people, with 11 state offices, hundreds of thousands of supporters, and hundreds of volunteer leaders across the country.

Our passionate belief is that every child deserves a good education that gives them a chance to rise. In a nation with increasing inequality and declining social mobility, it is more important than ever to fight for the millions of children in our country who don’t receive the quality of education they deserve simply because of their ZIP code, race, or economic status.

We are nowhere near where we want to be, but, working with our many partners, we have made real progress. Tens of thousands more students are reading on grade level because of our work. Tens of thousands more students are in better schools because of our work. Thousands of teachers have received high-quality mentoring early in their careers because of our work. Thousands of students of color who would have been tracked to lower-level courses are in advanced classes. And, thousands of parents in underserved communities have become effective leaders and advocates.

I’m proud of the impact we’ve made, but we need to double-down on our efforts at a time when so many students are being targeted or unfairly treated because of their race, religion, gender, and nation of origin; when vital funding that helps disadvantaged children is at risk; and when proven solutions that can significantly increase the number of children who read by third grade and who graduate high school career or college ready still aren’t in place across our nation.

If you agree, please think about what you’re willing to do and then let me know how we can work together. Thank you for all you do for children and for taking a stand at a time when children need us to show more courage and conviction than ever.

Sincerely,

Jonah Edelman,
Co-founder and CEO of Stand for Children

Sincerely,

Jonah Edelman,
Co-founder & CEO of Stand for Children

Our Impact

Across our states, we fight to ensure that the policies and investments made on state and local levels are focused on improving outcomes for underserved students. In 2016, our members and teams worked tirelessly and successfully on key policy areas that are proven to have the highest impact on closing achievement gaps and increase access to opportunities for all students regardless of their background.

Quality schools
for all

Every child, regardless where they live, deserves access to a great education. In districts across the country we are working with parents to ensure successful turnaround programs are used at the lowest performing schools, and we are championing quality school models at all types of public schools.

Washington State Law Fix

THE PROBLEM

In September 2015, the Washington State Supreme Court ruled 6-3 that funding for the state’s voter-approved charter-school law was unconstitutional. The ruling would have forced the closure of nine public charter schools serving more than 1,200 students.

STAND TAKES ACTION

As a leading organization in a coalition including the Washington State Charter Schools Association, the League of Education Voters, Democrats for Education Reform, and Washington Roundtable, as well as the affected public charter school families, we swung into action to fight for a fix that would keep the schools open. Tremendous parent activism and highly effective advocacy overcame long odds and politics that were not in our favor.

THE IMPACT

Senate Bill 6194 passed, creating a separate funding stream from state lottery revenues for public charter schools, which resolved the issues that led to the State Supreme Court’s initial ruling. The existing public charter schools remain open, now with higher enrollment numbers thanks in part to Stand’s involvement in summer and fall 2016 enrollment efforts in Tacoma. The way has also been paved for the opening of additional high-quality public charter schools, improving options for students across the state.


In addition, Stand worked in five other states to improve the quality of schools that enroll thousands of students.

Denver, Colorado

Supported strongly by Stand parents, the Denver Public School Board agreed to continue turnaround work in Southwest Denver. This included continuing transformation of three schools where Stand organizes parents and approving plans for two new middle schools.

Indianapolis, Indiana

Thanks to Stand-led parent advocacy, Project:RESTORE has lifted the formerly troubled School 93 from an F to an A on the state report card in just two years, and the school received Innovation Network School status. Also, with strong backing from parents, including a dozen parent testimonies in support, the school board approved two new Innovation Network Schools to replace other chronically failing schools. (Read more about our parents’ impact in Indianapolis in our history section!)

Chicago, Illinois

In Chicago, Stand partnered closely with 10 schools in underserved communities to recruit and elect 56 parents to serve on Local School Councils. With ongoing support from us, the parents have a decision-making role in critical issues that impact academic excellence, including approving school budgets and improvement plans, and hiring and evaluating principals. In addition, there has been a strong focus on improving attendance because research shows that school attendance is a significant factor in academic success. We worked intensely with two South Side schools to increase their average attendance rates 3-5 percentage points respectively, and extended our reach across the state through an online campaign.

Phoenix, Arizona

At the state level, Stand strengthened and supported a district consolidation bill to allow districts to join together when appropriate in order to support and strengthen lower-performing districts.

Memphis, Tennessee

After years of patient work toward approval of a charter compact, a strong push in fall 2015 rallied more than 100 parents who turned out at school board meetings, where more than a dozen parents testified. As a result, the Shelby County Board of Education gave final approval to the District Charter Compact Committee, which will work to improve public charter school access to resources and facilities and enable more effective district and public charter school communication and collaboration.

Springfield, Massachusetts

Stand has worked alongside the Springfield Empowerment Zone Partnership for the past year to oversee improvements to the district’s underperforming schools. We initiated Parent Leadership Teams at all 10 schools in the Empowerment Zone to provide input for the school improvement plans.

High standards
& rigorous assessments

In seven states, we continued our fight to ensure that students have high-quality academic standards and rigorous, aligned assessments that enable teachers, parents, and students to know whether students are on track. As many states released initial results from their new assessments, Stand and its membership base focused in particular on educating the public about anticipated score drops, preventing misguided assessment opt-out campaigns, and protecting states’ strong existing standards and assessments.

Arizona

In Arizona, we ensured that only bills supporting rigorous standards and standard adoption processes were passed.

Colorado

We ensured Colorado Academic Standards remained in place and that districts continued to administer the PARCC assessment.

Illinois

Stand Illinois continued to protect high-quality, Common Core-aligned assessments by defending PARCC against prolonged attempts to pass opt-out legislation.

Indiana

We defeated a move to change the school assessment standard to a lower-quality option.

Louisiana

Stand Louisiana supported the adoption of high-quality academic standards and aligned assessments by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education.

Massachusetts

We ensured that the state continues to prioritize high-quality assessments and accountability through the adoption of the Next-Gen MCAS and rigorous standards that focus on college and career readiness.

Oklahoma

We worked to improve the standards-adoption process to make the new academic standards as strong as possible.

Teaching
excellence

The person who stands at the front of the classroom every day has a huge influence on the success of a student, both in school and later in life. It is critical that all children have great teachers so they can reach their full potential. It is just as critical that educators have the support needed to excel in their important profession.

Oklahoma Fights for Teachers

THE PROBLEM

Oklahoma ranks dead last in the nation in teacher pay. Teachers haven’t had a raise in nearly a decade, and it’s gotten so bad that some fast-food chains pay more than a starting teacher salary in Oklahoma. That means fewer people are choosing teaching as a career, and many who do eventually flee to states bordering Oklahoma for much better pay. To add insult to injury, Oklahoma has also experienced the largest cuts to K-12 funding in the country during the past eight years.

STAND TAKES ACTION

To address the severe teacher shortage and education funding crisis, we qualified State Question 779 for the November ballot. This statewide ballot initiative would have increased teacher salaries by $5,000 as well as invested in programs to improve reading and high school graduation rates, increase college affordability, expand preschool access, and expand career training.

THE IMPACT

Although the measure was not successful at the ballot box, we sparked the momentum that is needed to continue this fight until funding is improved. We are not giving up, and we plan to capitalize on this progress as we shift our attention to pressuring the legislature to pass a comprehensive plan to address the teacher shortage and education funding crisis in Oklahoma.


Other accomplishments we’ve achieved to make sure teachers have the support and structure they need to thrive:

Dallas, Texas

Stand Dallas launched the Parent Teacher Home Visit Project, allowing more than 400 Dallas Independent School District (DISD) teachers to visit the homes of their students and meet with parents, building critical parent/teacher partnerships and ensuring academic success for students. In the first six weeks of the 2016 school year, DISD teachers and staff conducted 1,576 relationship-building home visits, which led to increased empathy and compassion, increased communication, fewer discipline referrals, more engaged students, stronger feelings of connection between teachers and students, and increased trust all around.

Sufficient funding
spent wisely

Schools in many states, such as Oklahoma and Arizona, are woefully underfunded across the board; in other states, such as Illinois, there is massive inequity in the amount of funding that goes to educate privileged students in wealthy suburbs and the amount that goes to educate disadvantaged students in urban and rural areas. Although schools with more money tend to do better, just increasing a school’s budget doesn’t guarantee better outcomes. That’s why Stand supports increased funding for schools in states with low funding, increased equity in states with a high level of unfairness, and wise spending across the board.

Some accomplishments in the past year in this area include:

Arizona

Stand fought for a $223 million increase in appropriations for schools and successfully defeated legislation that would have redirected early childhood funds, expanded programs that lack real accountability, and eliminated funding to needy school districts. Creating even more impact, we helped pass a state school funding measure that will provide an additional $350 million per year over the next 10 years.

Illinois

In the state with the most inequitable school funding system in the country, Stand Illinois worked toward improving the funding formula. This year, Stand and the Our Students Our Future Illinois coalition helped pass a budget package that included the following key priorities: $250 million distributed through an equity grant, a $75 million increase in an early childhood block grant, and authorization for improvements in the funding of the Chicago Teachers’ Pension Fund.

Tennessee

Through determined advocacy by parents and organizational partners, Stand Memphis helped to secure a $28.2 million increase in school funding for Shelby County Schools and prevented cuts to Shelby County’s successful Innovation Zone schools.

Quality Early
Childhood Education

Stand is committed to increasing access to quality early childhood education opportunities. The right start to education provides all students, especially in our most disadvantaged communities, with the foundation they need to enter school prepared to succeed.

Louisiana protects Pre-K budget

THE PROBLEM

In a year of severe budget cuts, the Louisiana State Legislature was threatening to significantly cut the early childhood budget, which would result in the potential elimination of high-quality pre-K for more than 16,250 4-year-olds.

STAND TAKES ACTION

In a furious lobbying effort, Stand Louisiana parent members activated quickly to protect the pre-K budget. Organizing two lobby days at the Capitol, 30 parents and students traveled to influence key decision makers and ask for no cuts to the early childhood budget.

THE IMPACT

Funding for pre-K programs was maintained at existing levels, even while other pieces of the budget were cut.


Stand is also working to expand access to high-quality early childhood education in New Orleans through a local funding measure and in Massachusetts by securing state funding for quality pre-K in high-needs school districts.

High School Graduation &
College & Career Readiness

In today’s economy, a high school diploma is not enough. Students need to excel and gain access to college and career training. Unfortunately, across the country, the high school graduation rate is abysmally low, and even if students have graduated they are not always prepared for succeed in life. We work passionately to change that trend.

Oregon passes state-wide ballot Measure

THE PROBLEM

Oregon is 48th out of the 50 states in its graduation rate. One in four high school students does not graduate on time, and three out of four high school graduates who attend community college start so far behind they must take remedial classes that do not count toward their degrees or certificates.

STAND TAKES ACTION

Stand drafted Measure 98, which creates a “High School Graduation and College and Career Readiness” fund of $800 per high school student. Oregon districts that meet eligibility requirements will be able to use these funds to expand career-technical education, college-level courses, and proven dropout prevention strategies. These programs are proven to improve graduation and college readiness rates for high school students. Stand qualified Measure 98 for the ballot; built a broad and diverse coalition, including communities of color organizations, labor, and business; and ran a strong campaign that netted the endorsement of nearly every major newspaper and reached voters statewide through TV ads and mail. In the November 2016 election, Measure 98 passed with 66 percent of the vote.

THE IMPACT

With the significant voter mandate as backing, the job now is to ensure that the Oregon legislature allocates the approximately $300 million necessary to implement Measure 98 in the next biennium while also maintaining sufficient funding for K-12 schools in general.

Elections

Elections can make the difference between steps forward in helping students succeed in school and life and steps backward for students who desperately need a better education than they’re getting. That’s why Stand recruits, endorses, and helps elect candidates who will make decisions that provide a better education to the students who need it most.

In 2016, we endorsed 100 candidates and 2 statewide ballot measures. Out of those we targeted 68 races with financial and volunteer support, winning 70 percent of the state-level races, 56 percent of the district-level races and 50 percent of the ballot measures. Our endorsements were based on an extensive, parent-led process, and we are deeply grateful for the many volunteer hours and the dedication of the many parent leaders who participated.

To help our targeted candidates, we invested in TV, radio, and digital ads and sent more than 100 mail pieces. In addition, hundreds of Stand parent volunteers knocked on more than 120,000 doors and made more than 90,000 phone calls.


Here are a few of the outcomes we helped achieve in collaboration with our many valued partners:

Colorado

Stand Colorado supported incumbent Joyce Rankin for the State Board of Education’s 3rd Congressional District in both the primary (where she defeated a virulent anti-Common Core activist) and in the general election. We also targeted and won two Senate races and two House races. This success builds on our fall 2015 wins at the local level, when we endorsed and successfully helped elect three Denver Public Schools Board members, including playing a key role in the reelection of the former board president in her at-large race.

Indiana

Stand Indiana supported the successful election of three of its four parent-endorsed Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS) board candidates, which will ensure continued forward movement by IPS, whose graduation rates and school quality are on the rise.

Louisiana

Stand Louisiana worked with close partners to reelect education champions in two contested races for the Orleans Parish School Board (OPSB). Those two, combined with the candidates who ran unopposed (including one candidate we helped recruit through our Education Leadership Institute), will ensure that an aligned, effective board majority will oversee the Recovery School District schools when they return to OPSB oversight in the next two years. In addition to this local success, Stand endorsed and helped elect seven candidates last fall to the eleven-member Louisiana Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, ensuring that the board is filled with student-focused leaders who will continue the recent positive progress in education.

Illinois

By successfully electing 13 of its 16 endorsed legislative candidates, Stand Illinois bolstered efforts to establish a more just system in which every child has access to a properly funded education with high-quality public school options and excellent teachers.

Arizona

Stand Arizona supported three candidates for the Maricopa County Community College District’s Governing Board to prevent extremists from shutting down campuses and denying low-income students an affordable, local higher-education option. Two of our three endorsed candidates won. We also supported three candidates for the Roosevelt Elementary School District board, and two of the three won.

Washington

Stand Washington supported eight legislative candidates, a candidate for the Washington State Supreme Court, and a candidate for Superintendent of public instruction, all with an eye toward bolstering our efforts during the 2017 legislative session. Our election endorsements were chosen to increase the likelihood that the state Supreme Court’s mandate of significantly increasing school funding will be carried out in a way that increases equity, raises graduation rates, and supports teachers, providing them with career pathways that will keep them in the profession and giving excellent teachers the opportunity to have greater impact. Five of our eight targeted legislative candidates won.

Our Members

Empowering parents who are directly affected by educational inequity has been at the core of Stand’s work since our founding.

This year, our organizers recruited, trained, and inspired more than 6,200 parents from across the country to stand up for their children’s education. These parents in turn reached out to and mobilized 150,000 people in their communities to take action for their children.

Maria Lucila Maldonado, Krystale Massey, and Ursula Allston-Hill are three of the outstanding parents with whom we have the honor of working.

Luci Maldonado Phoenix, AZ

District:
Alhambra Unified School District

Children:
Ramon, 21
Alejandra, 18
Francisco, 17
Maria Berenice, 14

Time with Stand:
7 years

“The reason I got involved with Stand for Children is because I want to defend my kids, and not just my own kids, but all of the children."

One great example of the advocacy work I’ve done most recently has to do with helping pass Proposition 123, a measure that will bring $3.5 billion to Arizona classrooms over the next 10 years.

I’ve worked with Stand to organize parents on several local issues in the past, and I have seen how several voices speaking as one can have an incredible impact. But with Prop 123, we were able to mobilize for an issue that affects every child in the state, especially those in underserved communities.

With the help of our amazing Stand organizer, Liliana, we made phone calls, handed out literature, and went door to door, talking to thousands of potential voters. It was close, but Proposition 123 ultimately passed, and funds are already making their way to public schools for supplies, infrastructure improvements, and raises for teachers. I believe our hard work made a big difference.

Krystale Massey Indianapolis, IN

District:
Indianapolis Public Schools

Children:
Whinter, 14
Terrance, 12
Tatenda, 10
Avah, 6

Time with Stand:
2.5 years

“I felt helpless because I voiced my concerns with the principal. When I felt like I wasn’t being heard, I contacted Stand."

I originally got involved with Stand through Stand University for Parents when it came to School 93. Through that class, I learned that my children were in one of IPS’s lowest-performing schools. Along with other School 93 moms, we wanted to improve our failing school. We collected signatures on a petition, rallied support at the school from teachers and parents, and spoke at school board meetings. The result: IPS 93 became a Project:RESTORE school for the 2014-2015 school year.

In just one year, IPS 93 went from an F-rated school to a C-rated school. But we weren’t done. We wanted to continue to improve, so we worked to have 93 designated an Innovation School for the 2015-2016 school year. Not all data is in, but there’s optimism that the school’s performance got even better.

With 93 headed in the right direction, we looked at the next step for our kids – John Marshall Community High School. John Marshall was so dangerous that I had previously decided to send my oldest daughter, Whinter, to another school in a neighboring township.

The academics were really bad, too. Only 3 percent of students in the middle school passed ISTEP, the state’s assessment test, in 2014.

Low academic performance, along with concerns about one school serving grades 6-12, fueled our effort to turn around John Marshall. We knew that if we organized we could make change. Using many of the same tactics, including delivering a petition with more than 500 signatures to the school board, we caught the attention of IPS leadership.

In August, the board announced that the school will no longer serve middle school grades and will become a dedicated high school. Further, the new John Marshall High School is on the list to become an Innovation School.

With success at John Marshall, I know that my children, and all the children on the East Side of Indianapolis, now have a better school and a better shot at a strong future.

Ursula Allston-Hill Boston, MA

District:
Boston

Children:
Kyrah, 7

Time with Stand:
2.5 years

“To me Stand means that every child has a voice and that every child’s voice can be heard."

When my daughter, Kyrah, was 3, I tried to enroll her in a high-quality pre-K program but was put on the waitlist. I know how important pre-K is and became really concerned that she was going to fall behind her peers who got in. Thankfully, I was able to pull a lucky number in the lottery to get her into Orchard Gardens when she was 4 years old. After witnessing firsthand the difference that program had in my daughter’s life, I knew I had to get involved and help other young children get the best possible start to their education.

I have been leading the Pre-K for MA campaign with Stand to build support to expand pre-K to 3- and 4-year-olds in Boston. I’m organizing my fellow members to gather thousands of petition signatures and sharing my story everywhere I can. I was invited to talk about the value of early education on the local news, and I testified in front of legislative committees. I’ve also talked directly to my elected officials by participating in Stand MA’s lobby days.

Work in Action

As Stand’s history shows, we’re in it for the long haul. For us, it’s not about stand-alone “wins.” It’s about making a life-changing difference for students by staying involved in all aspects of the work, ensuring that policies successfully reach classrooms, and keeping parents engaged in order to build lasting, systemic momentum focused on what’s best for kids.

School Quality
in indianapolis public schools

2012

We help elect two new members to the Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS) board, which leads to the exit of an ineffective superintendent.

2014

We work with partners to pass a state law that enables IPS to restart chronically low-performing schools as autonomous Innovation Network Schools. The new law provides the flexibility and tools IPS needs to turn around D-rated and F-rated schools.

2014

Stand’s first class of Stand University for Parents from School 93 recognizes that change is needed in its F-rated school. The parents enlist more than 200 fellow parents and petition the IPS board to bring in Project:RESTORE, a proven local school turnaround program.

2014

We elect three more education champions to the IPS School Board, creating a 6-1 majority.

2015

Seeing success in School 93, Stand parent volunteers advocate to “restart” chronically low-performing School 69 and School 44, bringing in new school leaders, new teachers, and a new curriculum to help turn around these troubled schools.

2016

Based on the progress made through Project:RESTORE, the school board approves School 93 to be an Innovation Network School. School 93’s rating goes from an "F" to a "C" in two years, and test scores are raised significantly even with a more rigorous assessment.

2016

Three of four Stand-backed candidates for school board, including a candidate we recruit to run in District 2, win election or re-election, maintaining the 6-1 majority in support of progress.

Literacy
in colorado

2012

In coalition, we draft and champion the passage of the READ Act. This Act provides per-pupil funding for districts to improve early literacy and creates grant programs for schools and districts to target interventions for students with serious reading deficiencies (SRDs).

2013–15

We successfully defendend the READ Act against multiple attempts to repeal pieces of the bill.

2014

Schools receive the first round of grants, and $33 million in per-pupil funds is distributed for students with SRDs.

2016

Our report, Improving Early Literacy in Colorado: Realizing the Promise of the READ Act, outlines specific recommendations to the Colorado Department of Education and the State Board of Education on how to improve early literacy in Colorado and support educators teaching young readers. Our team has been working closely with policy makers to advance the recommendations, and so far two of the three recommendations have been approved.

Financials

C3 Expenses
by state

Stand for Children Leadership Center maintains a three-star rating for sound fiscal management form Charity Navigator, the nation’s premier independent evaluator of charitable organizations.

C3 Board of Directors

Stand for Children Leadership Center maintains a three-star rating for sound fiscal management form Charity Navigator, the nation’s premier independent evaluator of charitable organizations.

C3 Board of Directors

Stand for Children Leadership Center is a 501(c)(3) public charity providing leadership development and training to everyday citizens. Long-term financial sustainability continued to be a key metric in FY2016. Significant progress was made on building working capital and operating reserve funds equivalent to six-months of operating expenses.

Audit availability:
The results depicted in these graphs and financial summaries are derived from Stand for Children Leadership Center’s audited August 31, 2016 financial statements, which contain an unqualified audit opinion. Copies of the full statements are available on our website www.standleadershipcenter.org.

Stand’s 2016 Annual Report includes updates on our work for the 2016 calendar year and our most recent audited financial statements.

C4 Expenses
by state

Stand for Children, Inc. is a 501(c)(4) membership organization which also includes state-level 527 organizations. The organization strategically uses resources on a year-to-year basis to engage in lobbying and electoral work where opportunities arise.

Audit availability:
The results depicted in these graphs and financial summaries are derived from Stand for Children, Inc.’s audited August 31, 2016 financial statements, which contain an unqualified audit opinion. Copies of the full statements are available on our website www.stand.org.

Stand’s 2016 Annual Report includes updates on our work for the 2016 calendar year and our most recent audited financial statements.

Our Donors

Thank you to our donors! We are fortunate to have an extraordinary community of supporters. We sincerely thank the donors listed below, as well as all those who donated up to $250, for their generous support and dedication to our mission.

Stand for Children Leadership Center

$1,000,000 +

Anonymous Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Bloomberg Philanthropies Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation Arthur and Toni Rembe Rock

$500,000 +

The Ballmer Group IPS Education Foundation Laura and John Arnold Foundation Reed Hastings via Silicon Valley Community Foundation

$250,000 +

Anonymous Barr Foundation Joshua and Anita Bekenstein James Crown George Kaiser Family Foundation Helios Education Foundation Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust

$100,000 +

Anonymous The Booth-Bricker Fund Communities Foundation of Texas The Crown Family Paul and Mary Finnegan The Joyce Foundation Meyer Memorial Trust Tim Schwertfeger and Gail Waller Sonic Corporation Washington State Charter Schools Association

$50,000 +

Anonymous Bezos Family Foundation Biller Family Foundation The Boone Family Foundation The Boston Foundation Charles Lamar Family Foundation George and Fay Young Foundation, Inc. Harold Simmons Foundation League of Education Voters Meadows Foundation Moriah Fund David Nierenberg Parker Family Foundation Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors Valley of the Sun United Way

$25,000 +

Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation Best Portion Foundation Council for a Better Louisiana ECET², a project of the New Venture Fund Emma and Georgina Bloomberg Foundation The Glick Fund The Indianapolis Foundation Levin Family Fund Longfield Family Foundation Mass Mutual Financial Group Providence Health Plan Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors Rose Community Foundation Spector Fund

$10,000 +

Adidas Jennifer Andres Anonymous (3) Bain Capital Children's Charity Ben B. Cheney Foundation The Beveridge Family Foundation, Inc. Emma Bloomberg Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona Judy Bushnell CBT Nuggets The Charlotte Foundation City of Tacoma Bill and Tammy Crown The Edward Wisner Donation Ryan and Mary Finley Janet Hamilton Hoglund Foundation Jacobson Family Foundation Trust Joe C. Davis Foundation John Legend, via Entertainment Industry Foundation Michael L. Smith and Susan L. Smith Family Fund Moeller Family Foundation PGE Foundation Pro Bono Publico Foundation Robert Reily Renaissance Foundation Jesse and Mindy Rogers Sequoia Foundation Anne and David Shane Rajeev and Jill Singh Standard Insurance Company Thunderbirds Charities Tooke Family Fund United Way of Metropolitan Dallas United Way of Pioneer Valley Don Washburn Michael Wells

$5,000 +

Tom Alberg Anne Myers Anonymous Margaret Boasberg Sue Levin and Jim Burkhart Bobbi Davis Exxon Mobil Corporation Jack Friedman Ted and Connie Gilbert Mark Hill Intel Corporation - Oregon The James and Fannie Malarkey Foundation Gerri Karetsky Joel Klein Lazar Foundation Lumina Foundation Lisette Nieves Northwest Natural Gas Company Mike Perigo Rodel Charitable Foundation of Arizona RosaMary Foundation Judy Runstad US Bancorp Foundation Vernier Software and Technology Macy Wall Winco Foods Foundation

$2,500 +

Anonymous Arizona Trial Lawyers Association Buildium, LLC Dimmer Family Foundation Dawnn Eikenberry Linda Eyerman and Bill Gaylord Greg Goodman Thomas and Patty Hefner Heather Lowenthal Martin J. and Tristin Mannion Charitable Trust Joan Morse Palo Alto Software Gary Powell Skip Rowley The Standard Kenneth Thrasher Umpqua Bank

$1,000 +

Anonymous (3) Apex Foundation Associated Professional Educators of Louisiana Stephen Bachelder Kirsten Brady Adam Davis Gun Denhart Edy Dorsen Jonah Edelman Brian Emanuels Toya and Chris Fick Margo Fowler Jim Garvey John and Ginger Giovale Tom and Karen Hughes Doug Johanson Bob Karetsky Walter A. "Buz" Koelbel Reid Litwack Julie Mancini Randolph Miller Anne Gimm Naughton Peter van Oppen Pacific Office Automation Emily Phan William Porter Doug and Becky Pruitt Steve Reynolds John Russell The Seattle Foundation Alice Schloss Lisbeth Schorr Greg Shaw Marilyn Smith So Hum Foundation Barre Stoll Steve Sundquist Todd A. Williams Family Foundation Jim Torrey Trillium Community Health Plan Susan Troccolo Jennifer Vranek Pamela Welch Traci Wheeler University of Oregon Vanessa Wilkins Arthur and Maggie Wright Memorial Fund Brian Zappitello

$500 +

Tyler Anderson Anonymous Kevin Boling Juli Brazile Jane Broom David Brown Artie Buerk Geoffrey Canada Frank Caropelo Peter and Lucia Gill Case Sarah Case Laura and Richard Chasin Debi Coleman Akilah Darden John and Jane Emrick Shawn and Charlie Engelberg Linda Florence Louis and Cindy Fontenot Tom Franta Ned Friend Suzanne Geary Emily Gilliland GPMCH Foundation Phyllis Haddox Chris Harker Mr. and Mrs. Cordell H. Haymon Carol Hildebrand Andy Hill Roger Honz Scott Jacobson Jessica Keiper Kevin and Amy Kohnstamm Elizabeth McCaw John Misko Mary Lynn O'Brien Justin Ohlemiller PacificSource Health Plans Brigitte Piniewski Ramsay Ringo Chris Robinson Margie and Elden Rosenthal Cheryl Scheinberg Noreen Shahani Carolyn Simpson Diane Sonnenstein Kira Sorensen Bill Steckel Sylvia Linington Fund of The Oregon Community Foundation Jenny Ulum Wal-Mart of Springfield, MA Maureen Weber Eric Wilson Mindie Wirth Carol Yahner

$250 +

Corinne Alef Janis Avery Brett Bader Joseph Bakke Katharine de Baun Karen Bennett Rekha Bhatt Betsy Boyd Jeffery Bratt Christina Brown Ann Burgess Dawn Chirwa Rhonda Chong Michelle Chrystal Kim Cleworth Matthew Craven Robin Detmer Jennifer Duncan Robert Dunlop Wesley Flinn Alec Flyer Heidi Fox Diane Hall Susan Hammer David Harris Lani Hayward Raquel Hecht Dana Hepper Holly Bamford Hunt Garrison Kurtz Billy and Kali Ladd Lisa Macfarlane Campbell Mathewson Elise McClure Shadi Miller William Miracky Kerry Moll Mary Mowday Lowell Murray Scotland Nash Timothy Nesbitt Rich Nevin Patricia Nobles Joan Obie Michael Orbino Carlyn Orians Stan Paine Guy Palumbo Paul Pastorek Mary and Mark Pierce Tim Punke Heather Redman Susan Rieke-Smith Bonnie Robbins Cindy Roe Clay Rudsenske George Russell Donna Samson Gretchen Schmidt Katie Scullion Kimberly Shin Janeen Sollman Kimberly Sordyl Amy Spinelli Kim Strelchun Von Summers Serilda Summers-McGee Janet Suppes John Tapogna Kerry Tymchuck Judy Vladimir Ky Vu Joni Wareham Karla Wenzel Stephanie WIcks Dan Widmaier Bonnie Williams Michelle Wilson Charlene Zidell

Stand for Children

$1,000,000 +

Anonymous The Ballmer Group Bloomberg Philanthropies

$500,000 +

Chickasaw Nation

$100,000 +

Action Now Initiative Anonymous (2) James Crown Tom and Susan Dunn Reed Hastings Dorothy Scarlett

$50,000 +

Anonymous Craig Barrett Anne Kubik and Michael Krupka David Rainbolt

$25,000 +

Michael Block Thomas Frist Greater Phoenix Leadership Ready Colorado Tim Schwertfeger Walton Education Coalition

$10,000 +

Arizona Business Coalition Mike Bezos Education Reform Now Phil Francis John Griffin Barbara Hyde Reid Litwack Faith and Glenn Parker Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors Cal Turner Michael Wells

$5,000 +

Community Choice Financial Lane Grigsby Al Hubbard Metropolitan Indianapolis Board of Realtors

$1,000 +

Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry Arizona Rock Products Association United Food and Commercial Workers Local 99 Century Link Communications Con-Tech International, Inc. Gregory Hahn Anne Hathaway Walter A. "Buz" Koelbel J.A. and Elizabeth Lacy Bob Millis John Mutz Bart Peterson Robert Smith U.S. Bank Foundation

$500+

Betsy Boyd

$250 +

Daniel Ambrose Anonymous Anne Bridgman Roger Honz and Shannon Campion Shelley Comfort Randy Fishfader Mr. and Mrs. Cordell H. Haymon Jani Iverson Doug Johanson Jen Ludwig Julie Mikuta Randolph Miller Clay Rudsenske Valery Rylands Jeani Frickey Saito Ellen Stevens Doug Yonko

Gift-In-Kind

Affiliated News Services, LLC Boundary Social Club Bright Ideas Cox Communications Emilio Narvaez Elden Rosenthal Sixteen Thirty Davis Wright Tremaine